First chance to see Olympic family neighbourhood Chobham Farm

09:00 19 March 2012

An early sketch of Chobham Farm, Stratford.

An early sketch of Chobham Farm, Stratford.

Archant

Plans for a new family neighbourhood in Stratford will go on display at two public exhibitions this month, so developers can gather popular opinion.

Chobham Farm, located to the west of Leyton Road and to the east of the Olympic Village and Westfield Stratford City, promises to deliver around 1,000 family homes, new parks, squares and open space for local communities to enjoy.

It also aims to integrate existing residents of Stratford New Town and the future communities of new Olympic neighbourhoods.

David Joy, chief executive at London and Continental Railways, said: “This is great for Stratford. Chobham Farm has been indentified as an ideal location for a family neighbourhood in the Stratford Metropolitan Masterplan and these plans will deliver this in phases.

“We want to hear your views. Once we have your feedback we will develop the plans and come back with a more detailed proposal.”

Geoff Pearce, East Thames director of development and asset management, said: “We want to work with the local community to make sure Chobham Farm becomes a vibrant and thriving neighbourhood that serves as a complimentary and integrated connection between the Olympic Park and Stratford New Town.”

The public exhibitions, where people can view early plans, talk to the project team and air their opinions, will take place on March 15 at Chandos East, 90 Chandos Road, Stratford, from 2pm to 4pm and on March 17 at the Stratford Spring Festival at Sarah Bonnell School, in Deanery Road, Stratford, from 12pm to 4pm.

Plans can also be viewed at www.chobhamfarm.com, and comments can be emailed to info@chobhamfarm.com or by calling for free on 0800 881 5411.

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