Police did not ‘crush anti-royal protest’ with Minority Report Royal wedding tactics

12:19 18 July 2012

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on wedding day PIC: John Stillwell/PA

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on wedding day PIC: John Stillwell/PA

PA Wire/Press Association Images

Royal wedding protesters who accused police of crushing “anti-monarchy sentiment” during Prince William and Kate Middleton’s nuptials, have lost a High Court battle.

Twenty people claimed they were unlawfully searched or arrested by officers before or during the marriage ceremony in London.

They said the tactics amounted an pre-emptive policy – akin to the film Minority Report; where crimes are detected before they happen in a dystopian state.

But two judges ruled today that the Metropolitan Police acted within their powers.

Lord Justice Richards and Mr Justice Openshaw, sitting in London, dismissed applications for judicial review.

“We find nothing in the various strands of the claimants’ case, whether taken individually or cumulatively, to make good the contention that the policing of the royal wedding involved an unlawful policy or practice, with an impermissibly low threshold of tolerance for public protests.”

Latest Stories from SNAP.PA

Things got worse for Jake as he also got told off for his toilet habits.

Read more

Supermodel launches Fashion For Relief Pop-Up Store to raise money to help ebola victims.

Read more

The judge reckons the PC did not have enough wit to invent the story.

Read more

Promoted content

Gamucci is a global leader and premier brand of electronic cigarettes

Gamucci has an electronic cigarette tailored for every need. We have a range of both disposable and rechargeable electronic cigarettes suitable for all adult smokers. And for a limited time, some great discounts.

Paddington

With Christmas comes a host of movies to the big screen, from festive family comedies to action blockbusters. Here is our pick of the best out next month.

The judge reckons the PC did not have enough wit to invent the story.

There’s been a rise in the number of fresh shop-bought chickens contaminated with the bug since August.

Fellow writers Ian Rankin and Patricia Cornwell also paid tribute.

New responsibilities over income tax and welfare could be heading to Holyrood.

Quirky London