Girl raises £21,500 for Great Ormond Street Hospital

11:09 02 January 2013

Yasmin Parsons having chemotherapy to treat her leukaemia during the Christmas period at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London. Picture: Andrew Parsons/i-Images/PA Wire

Yasmin Parsons having chemotherapy to treat her leukaemia during the Christmas period at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London. Picture: Andrew Parsons/i-Images/PA Wire

A two-year-old girl with leukaemia has helped family and friends raise more than £20,000 in four months for the world famous hospital that is treating her.

Yasmin Parsons, from Woodford Green, was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL) in August and is undergoing a two-year treatment with chemotherapy as an outpatient at Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital (GOSH) in London.

Her parents, photographer Andrew Parsons and writer Karen Attwood, who gave birth to their second child Isaac six weeks before Yasmin was diagnosed, created a blog telling the story of Yasmin’s treatment.

It aims to raise awareness of childhood cancer while raising money for GOSH, and has so far raised £21,500.

Ms Attwood said: “We were shell-shocked when Yasmin was diagnosed after being very ill for two months but we knew we wanted to do something positive with what was happening to us.

“We want to raise as much money as possible for GOSH so that other children and their families can have the same standard of care that we have received.”

Some £10,000 towards the fund was raised by Mr Parsons’ Fleet Street photography colleagues. They organised an auction of prints in October of some of their most celebrated images, including signed pictures of Prime Minister David Cameron, a portrait of Johnny Cash, and a print of John and Yoko’s bed-in.

Mr Parsons said: “The fact that my news photography colleagues raised so much in so little time shows what a positive contribution the industry can make.”

Matt Forrest, head of community fundraising at GOSH, said: “We are delighted with the fantastic amount raised in such a short time, this will make a huge difference to the work, patients and families of Great Ormond Street Hospital and we are incredibly grateful for all their support and hard work fundraising.”

The hospital provides world-class care to hundreds of children every day, but it needs to raise more than £50 million every year to help its work.

Money raised goes towards building state-of-the-art facilities, developing new treatments and providing the best equipment and support to the patients and families.

ALL is a cancer of the blood and is the most common and most treatable of childhood cancers. While in the 1970s, few children survived, advances in medical treatments available means that survival rates now stand at around 90 per cent.

Related articles

Latest Stories from SNAP.PA

Computerised technology will enable us to interpret dogs’ behavioural signals.

Read more

From feeding your tiger to defending your ‘castle’ – there’s more than one reason to carve a pumpkin.

Read more

If you were at London Bridge Station last Sunday you may have noticed a giant signal gantry that wasn’t there the night before…

Read more

Promotions

BT Home Smart Cam

When I was first told by my boss that I would be doing a review on the BT Smart Cam 100 I didn’t quite know what to expect. Before even looking at the product I was picturing it as nothing more than a web cam with a fancy name.

AGA Living Subscription

Every issue of AGA Living magazine is packed full of celebrity AGA owner interviews, interior and design features, ideas to inspire your culinary imagination, mouth-watering recipes and inspirational shopping ideas.

Investigators and scientists have made an initial assessment of the launch site as they attempt to work out how the launch of a commercial resupply ship ended so dramatically. The team has taken a “cursory look” around the site with Nasa saying it will take many more weeks to understand and analyse the full effects […]

Armageddon actress Liv Tyler dressed up her baby bump as a bun in the oven for Halloween.

It’s cost Rio Ferdinand a £25k fine and a three-match ban, but what do people think of the word sket?

The fashion giant’s have been called out for promoting an unhealthy body image with their skeletal dummies.

Quirky London