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A total of 28 London Underground and Overground stations will become stepfree over the next decade, transport bosses have announced.

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Investment in improving access for disabled passengers is to be increased by Transport for London.

An extra £18 million will be put into making 70 per cent of bus stops accessible by spring next year, and at least 95 per cent by the end of 2016.

In addition, a further £50 million will go towards improving the training given to bus workers

London Mayor Boris Johnson, said: “London now has the most accessible transport network in the country and one of the most accessible in the world.

“But it’s not perfect and we must go further – that’s why we’re investing hundreds of millions of pounds and using the most imaginative solutions and the latest technology to take the accessibility of the transport network to the next level.

“This means more step-free stations, accessible trains, and manual boarding ramps.

“It also means making thousands more bus stops in London accessible, transforming our website and signage, and lobbying for more money from the Government to help us deliver a network where every Londoner feels that the transport network is their network – for them and easily accessible by them.”

According to TfL, the number of journeys made by step-free routes on the Tube each year will almost treble, from 67 million to 189 million in 2021.

Stations including Bond Street, Finsbury Park, Greenford, Tottenham Court Road and Victoria are currently subject to improvement work.

TfL is also installing 80 wide aisle gates at 60 stations by 2013, increasing the number of platform humps to provide level access at a third of stations by 2016, and installing tactile paving on all platform edges across the network.

Fazilet Hadi, from the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), said: “Initiatives such as practical disability awareness training for staff, audio and visual announcements on buses, passenger assistance on the tube and travel mentoring, are a necessity for disabled people to travel independently.

“These ideas should act as an example for other transport operators.”

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